I Apologize ahead of time for poor spelling, Tom Hiddleston, Monster Hunter, Mass effect, Skyrim, illiac crests and the over all Nerd saturation of this blog. This is a personal blog so alot of random shit finds its way here.

2nd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Nothing is True. Everything Is Permitted with 73,168 notes

theheirsofdurin:

cybersyncing said: ok but hear me out: The Hobbit where everything is the same except Bilbo has the personality of Martin Freeman

Source: theheirsofdurin

1st September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Conronus the Chuggernaut with 398 notes

Source: rinspirational

1st September 2014

Photo reblogged from Ruined Childhood with 62,653 notes

andrewbelami:

prasejeebus:

These jokes are getting out of hand

goodbye

andrewbelami:

prasejeebus:

These jokes are getting out of hand

goodbye

Source: prasejeebus

1st September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Lightning's Stuff with 4 notes

lightning-thrush-artandstuff:

There comes a time in every person’s life where they decide that they want to play a certain clan in Vampire the Masquerade despite the chances of them cooperating with the rest of the coterie in canon lore being slim to none. Some people languish in this position for years, and some people, like I, have ballin’ storytellers that let them be gross Transylvania meatwizards.

Thus. Meet Reneer. Observe him intricately fleshcrafting his ghoul and childe-to-be, Merette Bratovitch, into a beautiful butterfly for other Tzimisce to drool over. Observe him also forgetting the Red Terror in his excitement over the very concept of having a shotgun protruding from his body. Roll to frenzy, dumbfuck.

1st September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Things Are Pretty Great with 63,827 notes

touchingtennantshair:

thewaywardqueen:

jessiphia:

I just…. there is so much wrong with this like THIS IS A SONG FOR PLUS SIZED POSITIVITY IN A WORLD WHERE THERE BASICALLY IS NONE and thin people STILL have to make it all about them and their feelings while girls are literally KILLING THEMSELVES out here to fit into a standard of beauty that should be considered arbitrary. 

I just. I need to sit down a moment I am literally so mad. 

DO YOU KNOW WHAT REALLY GRINDS MY BONES???

IN THE SONG SHE SINGS “FUCK THOSE SKINNY BITCHES- /NAH IM JUST PLAYING/ I KNOW YOU THINK YOUR FAT BUT EVERY INCH OF YOU IS PERFECT FROM THE BOTTOM TO THE TOP’

SHE LITERALLY SINGS THATS SHES KIDDING AND SHE THINKS YOUR PERFECT

SO YH FUCK THESE COMMENTERS BECAUSE YH THERE MAYBE SOME OTHER ISSUES WITH THE SONG BUT IM NOT DEALING WITH PEOPLE WHO DONT LOOK UP LYRICS

DEAR SKINNY GIRLS COMPLAINING: I’M SORRY THAT WHEN SOMEONE FINALLY WROTE A SONG THAT TELS ME I’M BEAUTIFUL, IT MADE YOU FEEL BAD (EVEN THOUGH IT’S BODY POSITIVE FOR ALL TYPES). IT FEELS FUCKING AWFUL, DOESN’T IT.

Source: jessiphia

31st August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Medieval and Early Modern Women with 11 notes

medieval-women:

Nzinga of Ndongo and Matamba

Queen of the Ndongo and Matamba Kingdoms (modern Angola)

Born c. 1583 – died 1663

Claim to Fame: Warrior queen and femme fatale

Queen Nzinga lived in a period when Portuguese power and the Atlantic slave trade were growing rapidly in southwest Africa. She famously refused to sit on the floor in the presence of the Portuguese governor, asserting her status as an equal by sitting on her servant’s back during negotiations.

Nzinga became queen by allegedly killing her brother and nephew. There are also rumours that she obtained a large harem of men that fought to the death in order to spend the night with her, and were then killed after one night of sex.

In 1641, Nzinga formed an alliance with the Dutch against the Portuguese and lead the resistance well into her sixties, personally leading troops into battle. She signed a peace treaty with Portugal in 1657 in order to rebuild her nation and resettle former slaves.

Despite numerous efforts to dethrone her, Nzinga died peacefully at age eighty.

30th August 2014

Post reblogged from Stark Raving Sane with 157,254 notes

tittily:

my little cousin got bit by a house spider and she was crying so i went to get some stuff to soothe and numb it but before i could even walk out the door i heard her quietly whisper ‘i can’t handle the responsibility of being spiderman’

Source: tittily

29th August 2014

Video reblogged from What am I dreaming tonight? with 56,489 notes

upallnightogetloki:

arineat:

the-omniscient-narrator:

nightmareloki:

rakeeshsorrel:

ashashi-corner:

HE DID NOT GET ROB PAULSEN TO DO THIS

HE DID NOT

NOSTALGIA CRITIC HOW—!!!

YES

Oh my god.  My childhood.  It’s……….yes.

OH MY FUCKING GOD

Sometimes tumblr brings something magical into your life and THIS is it!

OMFG I AM CRYING!

THIS IS BEYOND GLORIOUS!!

Source: saraarp

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Robots and Wrasslers with 29,278 notes

myutsuu:

for that pepsi-hating vampire in your life

myutsuu:

for that pepsi-hating vampire in your life

Source: yeahiwasintheshit

29th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Robots and Wrasslers with 124,196 notes

pickledpennies:

m00nchaser:

If bees become extinct we will have exactly 4 YEARS to live on this planet. I don’t understand how “not giving a fuck” is more important than your life…

okay, I have a thing to say about this. I’m no expert on bees, but I am a biologist (and entomologist) so I think there is something I can contribute that’ll be of worth.

I agree entirely with the sentiment that we must protect honeybees. Obviously they are massively important for biodiversity, as well as pollinating food crops for humans. There is no doubt that if all the honeybees in the world were to vanish in a day that the consequences would be dire.

However, I disagree that the main cause for concern regarding honeybee death is the use of Genetically Modified (GM) crops. I’d be very interested to read a research paper that says ‘GM crops have killed millions of honeybees’, if indeed such a paper exists because in all honesty I find it highly unlikely that this is a true statement.

Let’s start with some facts about GM crops:

1. The development of GM crops is a highly regulated process, bound by strict country-specific legislature. A great number of trials are carried out long before commercial planting of a GM crop is even considered. It is these trials, and accompanying laboratory studies, that ensure a GM crop is safe to non-target organisms (such as honeybees) by investigating direct and indirect effects (Nap et al. 2003).

2. Crops that are genetically modified to express insecticidal proteins (for crop pest control) have a high level of specificity. This means that the insecticidal proteins being produced by the GM plant will only affect a narrow range of insect groups because of the chemical properties of the protein. For example, GM crops expressing insecticidal proteins sourced from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) will only target some Lepidopteran pests (caterpillars; Romeis et al. 2006). Furthermore, a recent meta-analysis of the literature found that GM Bt crops do not negatively affect the survival of adult honeybees or their larvae (Duan et al. 2008).

3. GM crops can be tailored such that the novel gene is expressed only in particular parts of the plant. For example, GM Bt rice plants express the toxin in the stems but not the grains (Datta et al. 1998). This technique means that gene expression can be excluded from the flowers/pollen of the crop plant, so that bees and other pollinators would not be affected. Neat, huh?

So those are a token few reasons why GM crops are safer than perhaps many people believe (as the result of a lot of questionable, non-scientific articles). To come back to our main point about honeybee death, I would like to briefly mention a few alternative explanations for the recent decline in honeybee populations. These are as follows:

1. Many bees have died as the result of broad-spectrum insecticide use. These are pesticides that lack specificity, and can be harmful to non-target organisms. Neonicotinoids are a well-studied example of this (Decourtye & Devillers, 2010). Not to worry, though, because many broad-spectrum pesticides including neonics are well on their way out. Indeed, the EU recently banned a large cohort of neonic pesticides. This is still a topic of controversy, mind (Goulson, 2013).

2. Many bees have died as the result of Varroa mite infestation. Imagine you’ve been bitten by several ticks, except those ticks are the size of dinner plates. That gives you an idea of the severity of a Varroa mite infestation on a single developing bee. The parasitisation of bees by Varroa mites and other parasites is often accompanied by disease transmission. This can result in colonies dying within two years after infestation (Johnson, 2011).

3. Many bees have died as the result of ‘colony collapse disorder’.  This is a phrase that has popped up a lot recently, and is basically an umbrella term for the various causes of bee death including parasite infestation, disease transmission, environmental stresses, and management stresses such as poor nutrition (Johnson, 2011). Colony collapse has been attributed to broad-spectrum pesticide use in some instances. However, it is has still been observed in countries where broad-spectrum pesticides have been withdrawn (in the EU, like I mentioned earlier; Johnson, 2011).

So those are my main points. Please excuse the bullet-point nature of this; I was trying to keep it fairly short. Not sure I managed that haha. But anyway, my take-home message is that GM crops are not the enemy when it comes to honeybee decline. If anything, bees are at much greater danger from the use of broad-spectrum pesticides and from parasites and diseases. Using GM can even help to alleviate some of the problems associated with broad-spectrum pesticides, as they greatly reduce the need to apply such chemicals (Romeis et al. 2006).

A finishing note: Do your homework. Go on google scholar and read some of the literature, making sure it is recent (within the past 10-15 years). Literature reviews are a great way to find out what the consensus is on any given topic. Don’t use popular media as your main source of information where science is concerned; they tend to favour scandal and exaggeration. You want to know what’s really going on? Check out some research articles and see for yourself.

Thanks for sticking it through to the end of this impromptu mini-essay! —Alice

References:

Datta, K., Vasquez, A., Tu, J., Torrizo, L., Alam, M. F., Oliva, N., Abrigo, E., Khush, G. S., & Datta, S. K. (1998). Constitutive and tissue-specific differential expression of the cryIA (b) gene in transgenic rice plants conferring resistance to rice insect pest. Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 97(1-2), 20-30.

Decourtye, A., & Devillers, J. (2010). Ecotoxicity of neonicotinoid insecticides to bees. In Insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (pp. 85-95). Springer New York.

Duan, J. J., Marvier, M., Huesing, J., Dively, G., & Huang, Z. Y. (2008). A meta-analysis of effects of Bt crops on honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae). PLoS One, 3(1), e1415.

Goulson, D. (2013). Neonicotinoids and bees: What’s all the buzz?. Significance, 10(3), 6-11.

Johnson, R. (2011). Honey bee colony collapse disorder. DIANE Publishing.

Nap, J. P., Metz, P. L., Escaler, M., & Conner, A. J. (2003). The release of genetically modified crops into the environment. The Plant Journal, 33(1), 1-18.

Romeis, J., Meissle, M., & Bigler, F. (2006). Transgenic crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis toxins and biological control. Nature biotechnology, 24(1), 63-71.

Source: antinwo